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10 pet-friendly houseplants
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10 pet-friendly houseplants

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One way to watch over your furry friends is to choose pet-friendly houseplants for your home.

While houseplants have the ability to bring life to a room and purify the air while doing it, a drawback is that many houseplants are toxic to animals. Here are 10 plants that add beauty to your home without worry.

First, keep in mind that while many plants are technically safe for cats and dogs, it’s best to eliminate temptation and place all houseplants out of reach. This will prevent possible tummy aches and digestive problems in your pets. If a pet ever does ingest a plant, make sure to watch them closely for any signs of a negative reaction. Just because a plant is nontoxic for cats and dogs doesn’t mean ingesting it will make them feel good!

1. African violet

Want pet-safe houseplants with blooms? Look no further than African violet. This versatile, hardworking houseplant is right at home with your pets. It comes in a range of purple hues, and it’s low maintenance and thrives without bright light.

2. Aluminum plant

The variegated gray-and-green leaves of this plant makes it an attractive option for the home. It’s one of many great easy-care houseplants safe for pets.

3. Christmas cacti

Unlike their dangerous holiday counterpart amaryllis, Christmas cacti are not poisonous for pets like cats and dogs. The cactus may cause intestinal discomfort if ingested, but overall it’s a safer choice than many other festive plants.

4. Friendship plant

This plant is named for the ease with which it can be divided and shared—so if you happen to receive such a gift, rest assured it’s safe for your cats and dogs. But beware, pets may be especially drawn to the fuzzy, crinkly leaves.

5. Certain kinds of herbs

Indoor herb gardens are an easy, fun way to add fresh flavor to your cooking. But not all herbs are created equal when it comes to pet safety. Standards like lavender and oregano are off-limits, but pets are fine around basil, sage and thyme.

6. Peperomia

This quirky plant has blooms that resemble tubes of lipstick, and is safe for cats and dogs alike. A native of the tropics, it thrives in bright light and loves being outside in the warmer months.

7. Parlor palm

This is the perfect solution for pet owners looking to add a small tree indoors. Safe for cats and dogs, it’s also great for green-thumb beginners.

8. Polka dot plant

This plant is perfect for adding a fun splash of pattern to miniature gardens, terrariums, mixed containers and more. Available in colors such as white and pink, it’s as versatile as it is whimsical.

9. Prayer plant

Topping out at 6 to 8 inches, this plant is ideal for small spaces such as bookshelves and end tables. Its red, cream and green leaves curl up at night, giving it its name. What’s more, it’s one of the easiest houseplants you can grow.

10. Some succulents

Many of the most popular succulents — including hens and chicks, echeveria and rosettes — aren’t problematic. However, with so many varieties on the market, it’s best to research each individual plant. Jade, for example, while similar to other succulents, is actually dangerous.

(Better Homes and Gardens is a magazine and website devoted to ideas and improvement projects for your home and garden, plus recipes and entertaining ideas. Online at www.bhg.com.)

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