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UK police help return 3 stolen sculptures to Indian temple
AP

UK police help return 3 stolen sculptures to Indian temple

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UK police help return 3 stolen sculptures to Indian temple

This undated handout photo provided by the Metropolitan Police shows three bronze sculptures, which are being returned to a temple in the Tanjavur District in India, in England. British police say that three historically and religiously important bronze sculptures stolen from a temple in India more than 40 years ago are being returned after specialist detectives took action. Police said Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020 the idols were taken in 1978 from a temple in the Tanjavur district of Tamil Nadu.

LONDON (AP) — British police said Wednesday that three historically and religiously important bronze sculptures are being returned from the U.K. to a temple in India from which they were stolen more than 40 years ago.

Police said in a statement that the works were removed in 1978 from a temple in the Tanjavur district of Tamil Nadu. Although the thieves were caught and convicted in India, the bronzes remained missing for the next four decades.

The High Commission of India in London tweeted photos of the bronzes, describing them as “priceless” statues from the Vijayanagara period, which dated from the 14th to the 17th century.

In 2019, the High Commission alerted specialist art and antiques detectives at the Metropolitan Police that one of the sculptures was being offered for sale by a U.K.-based dealer.

Police said the dealer had bought the sculpture in good faith and no criminal offence was committed. The dealer agreed to send it back to India, and also identified and surrendered the other two missing idols.

“Once he was aware that they had been stolen, he immediately recognised that they should return to India,” Detective Chief Inspector Tim Wright said.

He said the sculptures were historically significant and also of religious importance.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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